Archive for the ‘awards’ Category


College Top 10

CT10

Meet the best college journalists in the South.


They’re the 2014 winners of the College Top 10, a unique journalism contest run by SPJ’s Green Eyeshade Awards – itself a unique contest.

For more than 60 years, the Green Eyeshades has recognized the best pro media work in the southern United States. It’s one of the oldest regional journalism contests in the nation.

Instead of simply rewarding one good story on one particular topic, the Green Eyeshades sought the best students who were consistently good at one thing. They had to submit multiple pieces on a single subject.

Alas, this year’s entries were terrible, except for a handful. Below are those few.

The judges didn’t declare winners in half the categories: design, movies, music, science, and sports. Why? Because nearly all the entries were solid and safe and just good enough. And that’s not what this contest is about – nor is “solid and safe” how you pursue a fulfilling career. Unless, of course, you want to work for 40 years to be “just good enough.”

Here are the winners who rebelled to excel…


Dylan Bouscher, Florida Atlantic University

Best Student Government reporter: Dylan Bouscher


Judging comment: This was tough: Reward one of the reporters who quite capably and incrementally covered SGA but never took a risk? Or recognize the only reporter who shot for the moon and hit the target, albeit with a glancing blow? Dylan Bouscher was the only entrant to feature video, which is novel because SGA is not a beat that lends itself to alluring B roll. The results were as good as one could reasonably expect. As for content, Bouscher tried mightily to explain complex topics, not always successfully. But he’s a reacher, and he’ll eventually eclipse his peers who are too timid to fail – and thus will never learn and excel.


Boucher’s comment: Growing up, I hated being told no. Once I started covering Florida Atlantic University’s Student Government and administration, that changed. Being told no to interview and records requests, from students and administrators whose paychecks I helped fund, only unleashed my passion and curiosity for watchdog reporting further. But my best stories didn’t result from hostility. They came from leveling with people: students and classmates trusting me to be human about the corruption and mismanagement. Doing that made working for the student newspaper by far the most fun and enlightening aspect of my college experience.


Max Jackson, Florida Atlantic University

Best photographer: Max Jackson


Judging comment: I judged this category last year and had the same problems this year: Great photogs who shoot the same darn thing everyday. Attention next year’s applicants: Take a hint from Jackson. He sent in a perfectly passable (no pun intended) pic of a quarterback looking downfield, but he also submitted a moving portrait of a dwarf at a medical marijuana debate – not your typical assignment. His third photo was the opposite – the school’s mascot with a bunch of kids. That’s usually a shoot and scoot, but Jackson captures a great moment, and his technical skills are beyond dispute.


Jackson’s comment: One of the most rewarding aspects of photography is that ability to capture a moment in time that will never occur quite the same way again, which I think many photographers would agree with. Each time I pick up my camera there is no certainty of what I will capture, whether it is the winning touchdown, or getting the perfect golden hour.  On the other side of that, is the knowledge that you need to “nail this shot” because there are no reshoots in live action photography. This passion I have developed, almost an addiction, has and continues to take me places that I never could have imagined the first time I held a DSLR.


Hannah Jeffrey, University of South Carolina

Best feature writer: Hannah Jeffrey


Judging comment: A surprisingly strong category – and from what I hear from other judges, the only one. The winner in this close race was Jeffrey, and not for any major philosophical reason like the other category judges have remarked. It’s simply that Jeffrey did the best across the board: She found fascinating people, got them to talk like normal people, and wrote about them for all people. It’s also interesting how she keeps her articles short and punchy, using subheads to great effect and generally eschewing the feature writer’s penchant for look-at-me composition and length. A humble feature writer!


Jeffrey’s comment: I’d argue features are the most satisfying yet most difficult kind of stories to write. Your reporting has to be thorough and extensive or else you won’t get the whole story — the feature interviews I’ve done that stick out have lasted a a few hours, at least. But features are all about picking out the good stuff, giving some color and making people care. You could hear a story, think “that’s a great story” and move on. But if it’s a really great story, it deserves details and attention.


Roberto Roldan, University of South Florida

Best administration reporter: Roberto Roldan


Judging comment: A disappointing category doesn’t mean the winner is disappointing. Roldan is unafraid to take on administrators, whether it’s questioning how they hide tuition hikes or hide expenditures behind “direct support organizations.” Roldan does a yeoman’s job explaining complex topics without oversimplifying or sensationalizing. Other entries in this category tackled big and important topics, but they failed in the execution: lacking clear narratives with impenetrable background. It’s not the reporting that’s so hard in government reporting, it’s the explanation – the why should I care? Roldan simply answers that question better than his peers.


Roldan’s comment: As journalists we talk a lot about holding those in power accountable, but a lot of times we relegate our time to stories that are safe, don’t piss people off and are quick turn around for the 24/7 news cycle. Most of my stories that dealt with issues of transparency and accountability in student government and university offices fell on deaf ears (so it goes), but one or two stories caused administrators to make measurable changes toward increased transparency — the ultimate reward for good journalism.


Cassidy Alexander, University of North Florida

Best columnist: Cassidy Alexander


Judging comment: Too many columnists are timid, both in topic and tone. Alexander is willing to mock a city council president (for his objection to a nude picture in a contemporary art museum) and riffing of her school’s attempt to create traditions. (“The university seems to have missed a very important point – a tradition is not something you can just compose into a list and announce at a party.”) She’s also willing to build from there, adding creative thinking to breezy writing.


Alexander’s comment: I see columns as opportunities to interpret the news for an audience that doesn’t always have the time or the background knowledge to do it for themselves. Bad things happen every day when people don’t understand what’s going on. It’s my responsibility to my audience to make things as clear as possible for them, no matter how daunting the topic is. When I’m mad about something and my writing makes someone else angry too, I’ve done my job. That’s what change happens.


Think you can do better? Enter the College Top 10 next year and prove it. Questions? Email me.


White guys: all is Wells

Want to nominate someone for SPJ’s “highest honor”? Better buy stamps.


The Wells Memorial Key recognizes “a member who is judged to have served the Society in the most outstanding fashion during the preceding year or over a period of years.”

You can nominate anyone you want, but they don’t really encourage it. The website says…

Submit all nomination materials unbound on 8 1/2 x 11 paper.

That’s right. Dead trees, not digital. They don’t make it easy for you. I think they like it that way.

Old white men, mostly.

Over the past 10 years (2004 to 2014) only one woman has won a Wells Key. In the previous 10 years (1993 to 2003) seven women won.

The last African-American to win was back in 1992. Last Sunday, another white man won a Wells Key. He’s the fifth in a row.

The Wells Key is perhaps the only awards program getting less diverse with each passing year.

If an award’s winners lack diversity, it’s a good bet the judges do, too.

The Wells Key is bestowed by SPJ’s “executive officers,” led by the president. Since 2000, only two women have served as president. A third started her one-year term just last weekend.

It probably won’t shock you to learn: The five consecutive white-guy winners were all former presidents.

One Wells Key winner suggested the ex-presidents win because they’re the ones who are “willing to do the work.” But it’s also true we tend to more easily recognize effort when it’s being done by people who look like us.

As an SPJ board member, I want to diversity the Wells Key winners by adding more judges. Last weekend, I made a motion to have SPJ’s entire 23-member board bestow the honor.

That’s not an ideal solution, since our board has only one Hispanic, one Native American, and no African-Americans. But at least we have 10 women and a mix of old and young. It’s a start.

It’s also a fight.

After I made my motion, old white men immediately (and condescendingly) undermined the idea…

• You’ll wilt under the workload – Past president Dave Cuillier said culling through all the nominees “is time-consuming” and “a lot of hard work.” (Apparently, lots of people mail in sheets of paper.) He doesn’t want to burden us.

• You can’t keep a secret – Wells Key winner Robert Leger, who’s president of SPJ’s foundation, said the award’s signature feature is its surprise – the winner isn’t announced beforehand. Leger said the board would let the winner slip and ruin everything.

• You got better things to do – Cuillier also suggested my motion was “ticky tack.” He suggested we stick to “bigger issues.”

I’d quote you exactly what both men said, as well as some other men, but for some reason, SPJ’s recording of that part of the board meeting cuts off. It’s the only board meeting video on the SPJ website that does that.

Regardless, these arguments offended me and at least a few others….

• The board already works hard. In fact, we could easily delegate more mundane governance so we’d have more time to look at “bigger issues.” I wouldn’t be the first SPJ board member to wonder if presidents load up their agendas with minor items so the board doesn’t have time to delve deeply into protected traditions.

• This is a big deal. How can deciding “SPJ’s highest honor” not be considered a “bigger issue”? How is diversity not a “bigger issue”?

• We’re not gossips. The SPJ board is loaded with journalists who have protected juicier sources than a Wells Key winner.

After much debate and urging, I amended my motion. It now simply instructs SPJ’s senior leaders to devise their own plan for expanding the Wells Key judging. They have until April.

When I asked if that would make the deadline for next year’s winner, the answer was a very squishy “maybe.”

My fear…

The old white men will simply delay, wear down, and outlast the reformers. That’s so common, it’s almost a cliche.

The fact is, there are nearly as many Wells Key winners in leadership positions as there are non-winners. SPJ’s foundation, called Sigma Delta Chi, has four officers – and three are Well’s Key winners, as are 10 of its 29 members. That’s a lot of status quo firepower.

Thing is, I haven’t even gotten to the most controversial part. First, I wanted to get my original motion through before I proposed this…

SPJ should mimic the NFL.

Since 2003, the National Football League has operated under something called the Rooney Rule. It requires NFL teams to interview minority candidates for high-level coaching positions.

The Rooney Rule doesn’t set quotas. It simply forces you to consider people who don’t look like you. And it’s worked. NFL teams have hired more minority coaches since the rule passed.

I want a Rooney Rule for SPJ.

There are many Wells Key winners I deeply respect (even though they might not respect me after this post). David Carlson, Steve Geimann, Irwin Gratz, Bill McCloskey, Mac McKerral, just to name a few.

SPJ wouldn’t be where it is today without those old white guys. But it needs more than old white guys if it’s going to survive tomorrow.

If you doubt that, here’s what one Wells Key winner told me – and the entire foundation board – when I mocked the paper-only application process…

It’s hardly burdensome to ask for hard copies.

Yup, that’s how you endear yourself to the next generation of journalists.

BEST OF THE SOUTH

CT10

Meet the best college journalists in the South.


They’re the 2013 winners of the College Top 10, a unique journalism contest run by SPJ’s Green Eyeshade Awards – itself a unique contest.

For more than 60 years, the Green Eyeshades has recognized the best pro media work in the southern United States. It’s one of the oldest regional journalism contests in the nation. But until now, it never honored the best college journalists below the Mason-Dixon Line.

Instead of simply rewarding one good story on one particular topic, the Green Eyeshades sought the best students who were consistently good at one thing. They had to submit multiple pieces on a single subject.

Alas, the judges couldn’t find 10 – the categories for music and movie coverage have no winners this year. Those entries simply didn’t tingle the judges’ toes. But they were downright enthusiastic about the other eight.

Here they are…


Roberto Roldan

Best feature writer: Roberto Roldan


Judging comment: Every college journalist who complains, “There aren’t any interesting students on this campus” should be beaten with a baseball bat by Roberto Roldan, who finds a migrant worker going to business school, another student mentoring an orphan, and an alumnus creating installation art in impoverished areas. Better yet, Roldan’s whiny, lazy peers should just pay him for story ideas.


Roldan’s comment: The most difficult, but also most rewarding, part of feature writing is always the interview. With human interest pieces, you get the opportunity to connect with sources in a way that’s really different from more combative interviews journalists do on a daily basis.

When your source is telling you very private stories and you’re holding back tears of anguish or joy, trying to remain composed and professional, you know the story you have is going to be good. Building good enough rapport with your source that they’ll share things with a complete stranger that they’ve never shared with their closest friends – that’s the hard part.


Gregory Rawls

Best sports reporter: Gregory Rawls


Judging comment: He can write a gamer, but then again, so can a lot of college sportswriters. Rawls, however, shows an interest in more than the score. Whether he’s succinctly explaining a disastrous season record for the football team or profiling a Nigerian  basketball player, Rawls strives for reasons and not stats.


Rawls’ comment: Nowadays, when people can find the scores for games via an app on their phones, game coverage can pose some difficulty. For a school newspaper that only runs twice per week, the major difficulty of covering sports is finding new ways to make an already known story interesting.

Additionally, it’s sometimes hard for me, personally, to remove my excitement when covering a game objectively – not impossible per se. But these minor issues are nothing compared to the delight of being able to write about something I am passionate about.

Sports are an amazing way to bring people together and distract us from the worries and troubles of everyday, monotonous life. To help get a sports conversation started with a good feature or a play-by-play story is a rewarding experience for a sports writer.



Best designer: Kristmar Muldrow


Judging comment: Too many young designers are afraid of their freedom. Big photos make them nervous and negative space is scary. Muldrow embraces both and throws in large typography for good measure. Her designs are simple and clean and without high-tech tricks. Those are traits of a designer who can work quickly and efficiently while still impressing readers and luring them to the text.


Muldrow’s comment: I have always loved to tinker with things, whether it’s a drawing, an instrument, or a design. One of the challenges of newspaper design is tinkering at high speed, ironing out details on tight deadlines.


Claire DodsonBest science writer: Claire Dodson


Judging comment: Nothing flashy here – no whimsical infographics or swirly multimedia animations to explain complex topics. Dodson just writes straightforwardly about the research and science being conducted and presented on her campus. But not even halfway through each of her ledes, you feel her passion for her topics, and by the end, you’ve learned something without ever feeling like you were being taught. And that’s high praise for any journalist.


Dodson’s comment: When I cover science and research, I see myself as both interpreter and storyteller. You have to pull out the interesting and relatable parts of someone else’s work and then piece the facts together to create a picture of that person or that discovery.

I love going to a lecture or profiling a researcher and figuring out why their work is so important to them – their passion is just as important as the work they do. So much character and personality sneaks beneath a university research press release.


RJ Vogt

Best columnist: RJ Vogt


Judging comment: Vogt is willing to suffer for his craft, training for a fraternity boxing tournament. And he’s willing to go national (a compelling take on the Trayvon Martin killing) and personal (contemplating his sister’s wedding). Too many college columnists are guarded in their opinions and narrow in their focus. Vogt doesn’t seem afraid of anything or any topic.


Vogt’s comment: There’s something intoxicating about the opportunity to write down your experiences and personal opinions, some wild freedom in the manifestation of free thought. But I’ve always maintained that a good opinion is based in fact.

In every column I write, I strive to base my writing off the truth around me. A column is not a license to scribble across a page – it’s a privilege to interpret reality. Interpret with style and flair and passion, but never deviate from the truth. It’s the University of Tennessee’s motto: “The truth shall set you free.”


Ryan Murphy
Best photographer: Ryan Murphy


Judging comment: The only entry to feature three photos of no one smiling or even enjoying themselves. Whether it’s a diligent track athlete training, a crushed football coach hiding in his hands, or a child protester peering over a handmade sign, Murphy captures intense moments.


Murphy’s comment: The most rewarding part of photography for me is the wide variety of work you can do. From portraits to landscapes, news to sports. I don’t like to specialize in any one category, preferring to take on any assignment I can. Learning (and in some cases making it up) as I go. Sometimes the unknown can be difficult, but that’s part of the fun.

Photography is never boring. No matter what the assignment, there’s always something new to try – a different angle or a different technique.


Daniel Jansouzian
Best Student Government reporter: Daniel Jansouzian


Judging comment: Covering SG is the most important and least sexy beat in college media. Fact is, if college media doesn’t report on the millions (and yes, it’s millions) of dollars that SGs spend, no one else will. Jansouzian does the important and unsexy work with clarity and simplicity, explaining complex concepts to readers in plain English.


Daniel’s comment: One of the greatest joys of covering SGA was the connections I made with people, not only in coverage of student government, but in other areas of campus. The SGA members were involved in student organizations, Greek life, campus jobs, and sports. So knowing them as a reporter turned out to be a huge advantage for me.

A difficult aspect of covering SGA came at the end of summer 2013, when the executive vice president-elect was arrested for the possession and manufacturing of marijuana. I knew SGA members would not want to go on record about it. Still, I had to put aside my personal feelings and do the best reporting I could.


Thad Moore

Best administration reporter: Thad Moore


Judging comment: From questionable calls by the administration after a rape report to old facilities affecting pharmacy students to an analysis of the school’s past five years, Moore eschews flash for substance. Administrators often try to defuse the news by confusing young reporters. Moore cuts through.


Moore’s comment: Covering a university’s administration can be dry — lots of audits, budget documents, and all-day board meetings — especially when football games and Greek Life stories attract readers. But it’s rewarding to dig up stories that matter to students and tell them in a way that captures their attention, and I think that’s the value of the beat.


Think you can do better? Enter the College Top 10 next year and prove it. Questions? Email me.

HIRE THESE PEOPLE…

Meet the best college journalists in the Southeast. That’s Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina.

How do I know they’re the best? Because they’re the Region 3 winners in SPJ’s college annual journalism contest, called the Mark of Excellence. They’ll compete nationally against their peers in 11 other regions, with SPJ announcing those results in May.

So hiring editors, take note of these names…


Breaking News Photography (Large)

Ryan Murphy
Florida Atlantic University


Breaking News Photography (Small)

Brittany DeLong
Troy University


Online News Reporting

Jacob Sadowsky
University of Central Florida


Best Use of Multimedia

Daniel Roth
University of Alabama


General News Photography (Small)

Sarah Williamson
Flagler College


General News Photography (Large)

Karli Evans and Kelly Smith
University of Miami


General News Reporting (Large)

David Schick
University of Georgia


General News Reporting (Small)

Brittany DeLong
Troy University


Online In-Depth Reporting

Jacob Sadowsky and Jake Rakoci
University of Central Florida


In-Depth Reporting (Large)

The Crimson White staff
University of Alabama


In-Depth Reporting (Small)

Kelsey McMullan, Allison McLellan, Hershlay Raymond
Florida Institute of Technology


Photo Illustration

Taylor Craig Sutton
University of Georgia


Non-Fiction Magazine Article

Katherine Owen
University of Alabama


Editorial Cartooning

Michael Beckom
Savannah College of Art and Design


Editorial Writing

The Crimson White Editorial Board
University of Alabama


Online Opinion & Commentary

Hannah Bleau
Flagler College


General Column Writing (Large)

Becky Sheehan
Auburn University


General Column Writing (Small)

Hannah Webster
University of Tampa


muse

Feature Photography (Large)

Kelly Smith
University of Miami


Feature Photography (Small)
Ryan Patrick
SCAD Atlanta


Feature Writing (Large)

Chris Alcantara
University of Florida


Feature Writing (Small)

Alexa Epitropolous
Flagler College


Online Feature Reporting

Nicole Vila
University of Miami


Sports Photography (Small)

Eric Patrick
Barry University


Sports Photography (Large)

Zach Beeker
University of Miami


Online Sports Reporting

Jake Rakoci and Justin Levy
University of Central Florida


Sports Column Writing

Alec Shirkey
University of Georgia


Sports Writing (Large)

Isabelle Khurshudyan
University of South Carolina


Sports Writing (Small)

Matt Pagels
Flagler College


Television General News Reporting

Ashleigh Holland
University of South Carolina


Television Feature Reporting

Bradley Whittington
University of Alabama


Television Breaking News Reporting

Tommy Townsend
University of Alabama


Television In-Depth Reporting

Kathryn Sotolongo and Nick Swyter
University of Miami


Television News and Feature Photography

Bradley Whittington
University of Alabama


Television Sports Photography

Tori Petry
University of Florida


Television Sports Reporting

Nathan Canniff-Kuhn
University of South Carolina


Radio Feature

David Caddell
Troy University


Radio In-Depth Reporting

Elly Ayres
University of Florida


Radio News Reporting

Hailey Swartwout
University of Alabama


Best Television Newscast

WUFT-TV
University of Florida


Best Affiliated Web Site

The Miami Hurricane
University of Miami


Best Daily Student Newspaper

The Crimson White
The University of Alabama


Best Non-Daily Student Newspaper

The Auburn Plainsman
Auburn University


Best Independent Online Student Publication

Flagler College Gargoyle
Flagler College


Best Student Magazine

Distraction
University of Miami

How to be Chapter of the Year

If you’re in charge of a pro or student SPJ chapter, you might be wondering…

How the hell do we win a National Chapter of the Year award?

As one of SPJ’s 23 national board members, I can tell you: I have no friggin’ idea. All I know for sure is that there’s a byzantine system for choosing…
 


The byzantine system

Each chapter uploads an annual report to SPJ headquarters in Indianapolis (and those suckers are due May 1 for campus chapters and May 6 for pro chapters).

HQ forwards those reports to the corresponding regional directors – there are 12 of us – who read them and fill out their own reports.

The regional directors send everything back to HQ.

HQ dumps all of the pro stuff on the board’s pair of at-large directors, who choose the best large (75 or more members) and small (less than 75) chapters of the year based on…I dunno. Whatever they want, I guess.

The student packages go to the vice president for campus affairs, who told me last weekend that he chooses one winner only from those the regional directors touted in their reports.
 


The nonexistent rules

Of course, this just tells you how the information circulates. It doesn’t describe what qualities a chapter must possess to impress.

You’d think for such a high honor, there’d be some rules or guidelines or even hints. But this is the only mention of the topic I could find on SPJ’s website, halfway down the page summing up the myriad of SPJ awards…

Outstanding Professional and Campus Chapter Awards
The awards salute chapters for overall excellence in supporting the Society’s missions, members and the profession. Up to three large and three small professional chapters will be selected each year for recognition, with one in each category being chosen as the chapter of the year. On the campus level, one will be selected from each of SPJ’s 12 regions, with one being chosen as the overall campus chapter of the year.

Weirdly, there are lesser chapter awards called the Circle of Excellence, and they get their own page. But it doesn’t tell you who does the choosing.
 


My criteria

The SPJ board meets again at the Excellence in Journalism convention in Anaheim this summer, and I’ll agitate for some clearer standards.

For discussion purposes, here are mine…

• Programming (30 percent) – Nothing else matters if you don’t do something. You can host lectures and panel discussions, but you get extra credit for hands-on creativity. I’m partial to my home chapter, SPJ South Florida, which gets serious (an obit-writing workshop in a funeral home) and humorous (a Speed Team Scrabble tournament) with its participatory programs.

• Membership (15 percent) – Good programs means more members. So if you do the former, you’re halfway home on the latter.

• Outreach (15 percent) – The next SPJ president, Dave Cuillier, blew my mind over the weekend when he told me, “We should be the Society for Professional Journalists.” He’s right. SPJ shouldn’t just train journalists, it should educate their customers – who are, basically, everyone who can read. Does your chapter visit high school classes? Speak about our craft to local business groups and charities? Defend free speech even when it’s not journalists doing the speechifying?

• Scholarships (10 percent) – Some chapters, like Western Washington, award a couple of $2,000 scholarships each year. But even if it’s just one for $200, you’re helping the next generation of journalists.

• National volunteering (10 percent) – SPJ needs judges for its annual Mark of Excellence and high school essay contests. It has committees that need members and regional directors who need assistant RDs (mine is Lindsey Cook). You can run for national office yourself – then help me fix these damn Chapter of the Year awards.

• Convention and conference attendance (10 percent) – Woody Allen once said, “80 percent of success is showing up.” Here it’s only 10 percent, because it costs money to attend SPJ’s national convention and even its regional conferences. Some chapters have more passion than cash, and they shouldn’t be punished for that.

• Reporting on time (10 percent) – If you turn in your annual report late, it costs you. Harsh? Hell, no. We’re journalists. We’re supposed to make deadlines.
 


Now what?

I suppose I could say, “Tell SPJ leaders what you think!” But when editorial page writers and op-ed columnists do that, not much usually happens. So I plan to announce my own SPJ Awards this summer. And unlike the official SPJ awards, mine will come with prizes. Weird prizes.
 

Mark of Excellence winners

Below are the Region 3 winners in SPJ’s college journalism contest, called the Mark of Excellence. The first-place winners compete nationally against their peers in 11 other regions. SPJ will announce those results May 2.

But even the second- and third-place winners who aren’t competing nationally have nothing to complain about. They’re still some of the best college journalists in the southeast United States – which covers Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina.

Oh, and if you don’t see a second or third place listed, it’s not a mistake. It just means SPJ’s hard-ass judges don’t dole out awards like a T-ball league or a Student Government banquet. The MoEs matter because they’re friggin’ hard to win.

So anyway…

 

PHOTOGRAPHY


Breaking News Photography (Large)

First Place
Kristy L. Densmore
Trayvon Martin protest
University of Georgia

Second Place
Charles Pratt
Barrackin’ the Burrow
Florida Atlantic University

Feature Photography (Large)

First Place
Kelly Smith
State of solitude
University of Miami

Second Place
Kelly Smith
Swimming with pride
University of Miami

Third Place
Rachel Steinhauser
Love at first bite
University of Miami

Feature Photography (Medium)

First Place
Joseph Jacob
Mangue Banzima doesn’t think, he just shoots
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Second Place
Joseph Jacob
A pirate’s life for the weekend
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Feature Photography (Small)

First Place
Sarah Williamson
Together again
Flagler College

Second Place
Brittany Mullins
The specter of the countess
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) Atlanta

Third Place
Cait Duffy
2012 Republican National Convention
Eckerd College

General News Photography (Large)

First Place
Dana Edwards
Willy Dickey picks peas from Orchard Pond Organic Farm
University of Florida

Second Place
Christine Capozziello
FAU’s faculty rip President Saunders and higher-ups in annual survey
Florida Atlantic University

General News Photography (Medium)

First Place
Joseph Jacob
Operation New Hope gives dogs and inmates a second chance
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Second Place
AJ Gonzalez
Walkers continue their journey to end domestic violence
Barry University

Sports Photography (Large)

First Place
Caitlin Trotter
Sidelined
University of Alabama

Second Place
C.B. Schmelter
Football celebration
University of Georgia

Third Place
Ryan Murphy
FAU football
Florida Atlantic University

Sports Photography (Small)

First Place
Dom Cuppetilli
Wakeboarding competition
Eckerd College

Second Place
Lincoln Andres-Beck
Women’s rugby win
Eckerd College

Third Place
Pablo Serrano-Otero
Savannah Derby Devils
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Photo Illustration (Large)

First Place
Randy Schafer
Honey Funk records
University of Georgia

Second Place
Kelly Smith, Ivana Cruz, Sophianna Bishop
Political issue cover
University of Miami

Third Place
Pablo Serrano-Otero
Honey Funk records
University of Miami

Photo Illustration (Medium)

First Place
Kayla Sloan
Can you disconnect
University of North Alabama

WEB


Best Affiliated Web Site (Large)

First Place
Staff
The Red and Black
University of Georgia

Second Place
Staff
The Miami Hurricane
University of Miami

Third Place
Staff
The Crimson White
University of Alabama

Best Affiliated Web Site (Small)

First Place
Staff
The Online Current
Eckerd College

Best Independent Online Student Publication (Large)

First Place
Staff
South Florida News Service
Florida International University

Best Independent Online Student Publication (Medium)

First Place
Staff
District
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Best Independent Online Student Publication (Small)

First Place
Staff
The Connector
Savannah College of Art and Design Atlanta

Second Place
Staff
Flagler College Gargoyle
Flagler College

Online Feature Reporting (Large)

First Place
Christina Miller
Twice read: a story about letters
University of South Florida

Second Place
Emily Bloch
FAU’s Bonfire Bands
Florida Atlantic University

Third Place
Randy Schafer
Photographer poses perfection, almost
University of Georgia

Online Feature Reporting (Medium)

First Place
Danielle Austin and Joseph Jacob
Operation New Hope gives dogs and inmates a second chance
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Second Place
Susan Kemp
A-Town Get Down remembers student through music, art
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Third Place
Brandon Buchanan
The Ultimate Reconciler, Robby Waddell
Full Sail University

Online Feature Reporting (Small)

First Place
Lauren Ely
A Difference Between Faiths: Politically Irrelevant
Flagler College

Second Place
Tiffanie Reynolds
Bible study group bridges religion and sexual orientation
Flagler College

Third Place
Adam Hunt
A Look Into the World of Local TV News
Flagler College

Online In-Depth Reporting (Large)

First Place
Karla Bowsher and James Shackelford
Public Distrust
Florida Atlantic University

Second Place
Lindsey Cook
The problems with Study Abroad
University of Georgia

Third Place
Jacob Sadowsky
Man Filing Hazing Charges Against UCF ATO
University of Central Florida

Online In-Depth Reporting (Medium)

First Place
Staff
2012 Savannah Film Festival
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Second Place
Shannon Craig
T-SPLOST
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Online In-Depth Reporting (Small)

First Place
Ryan Buffa
Preacher or protester?
Flagler College

Second Place
Michael Newberger
Is your house making you sick?
Flagler College

Online News Reporting (Large)

First Place
Luis Giraldo
Tale of Two Marines
University of Florida

Second Place
UP Staff
Lowdown on the lockdown
Florida Atlantic University

Third Place
Jacob Sadowsky
Entry Fee
University of Central Florida

Online News Reporting (Medium)

First Place
Shannon Craig
Free HIV test: excuses need not apply
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Second Place
Daniel Alvarez
Student finds footing in lawsuit against school
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Online News Reporting (Small)

First Place
Sarah Williamson
Muslim student responds to ignorance
Flagler College

Second Place
Ryan Buffa and Joshua Santos
Mitt Romney visits Flagler College
Flagler College

Online Sports Reporting (Large)

First Place
Christina Miller
Bowling in the 21st century
University of South Florida

Second Place
Ryan Black
Celebrity’s glare transforms Georgia athletics
University of Georgia

Third Place
Jake Rakoci and Eric Py
UCF Hopes to Grow From Tough Loss
University of Central Florida

Online Sports Reporting (Medium)

First Place
Allen Duncan
Money reallocations disband three student teams
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Online Sports Reporting (Small)

First Place
Eric Albury
Athlete endures religious fast
Flagler College

Second Place
Jaycob Ammerman
Jillian Unitas won’t mind seeing Brees break record
Flagler College

Third Place
Eric Albury
Minor leagues hold dreams for Flagler men’s baseball
Flagler College

Online Opinion & Commentary (Medium)

First Place
Susan Kemp
Columns
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Second Place
Staff
Columns
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Online Opinion & Commentary (Small)

First Place
Phil Grech
Columns
Flagler College

Second Place
Nikki Igbo
Columns
Savannah College of Art and Design Atlanta

Third Place
Erin White
Columns
Savannah College of Art and Design Atlanta

BROADCAST


Best All-Around Radio Newscast

First Place
Staff
WUFT Front Page
University of Florida

Second Place
Staff
District
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Best All-Around TV Newscast

First Place
Staff
Carolina Magazine
University of South Carolina

Second Place
Staff
WUFT NEWS First at Five
University of Florida

Third Place
Staff
NewsVision
University of Miami

Radio Feature

First Place
Jenny Williamson
Smart meters electrify debate
Florida Gulf Coast University

Second Place
Nathalie Boyd
memorials
Troy University

Third Place
Nathalie Boyd and Paul Boger
Funds for football
Troy University

Radio In-Depth Reporting

First Place
Nicholas Lawrence
This collegiate life: generations
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Second Place
Luis Giraldo
Venezuelan voters: the personal journey
University of Florida

Third Place
Nathalie Boyd and Paul Boger 
Funds for football
Troy University

Radio News Reporting

First Place
Cameron Taylor
Cedar Key oyster industry in trouble
University of Florida

Second Place
Rebecca Farmer
Mayport ferry
University of Alabama

Third Place
Susan Kemp and Danielle Austin
Newt Gingrich holds rally in Savannah
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Radio Sports Reporting

First Place
Taylor Crosby
Student rec center expansion
University of Alabama

TV Breaking News Reporting

First Place
Cameron Taylor
Growing Evidence suggests missing UF student likely murdered
University of Florida

Second Place
Joshua Santos and Ryan Buffa
Mitt Romney visits Flagler College
Flagler College

Third Place
Tommy Townsend
Snow fell on Alabama
University of Alabama

TV Feature Photography

First Place
Luis Giraldo
Art education
University of Florida

Second Place
Jacob Fisher
Radioiodine therapy
University of South Carolina

Third Place
Chelsea Parler
Celtic festival
University of South Carolina

TV Feature Reporting

First Place
Kyara Massenburg
The three little bears
University of South Carolina

Second Place
Hannah Moseley
Spina bifida: Thomas Clark’s story
University of South Carolina

Third Place
Mary Beth Harrison
Pomping process
University of Alabama

TV General News Reporting

First Place
Tommy Townsend
Championship gear
University of Alabama

Second Place
Mamie Shepherd
Voting from behind bars
University of Georgia

Third Place
Krista Bagley
Fake IDs
University of South Carolina

TV In-Depth Reporting

First Place
Kierra King and Aaron Tillman
The need to belong
Florida A&M University

Second Place
Shannon Sommerville
Tommy John surgery
University of Miami

Third Place
Douglas Scarpa, Nicholas Lawrence, Shannon Craig, Kenneth Rosen
The final stitch
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

TV News Photography

First Place
Brandon McMullen and Kristen Swilley
The promise
Florida A&M University

Second Place
Valeria Sistrunk
Obama and welfare
Florida A&M University

Third Place
Laura Christmas
Herding Gator
University of Florida

TV Sports Photography

First Place
Victor Makali and Danielle Austin
Get to Know: SCAD longboarding club
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

TV Sports Reporting

First Place
Jen Somach
Quarterback
University of Miami

Second Place
Mike Wadsworth
Lakeisha Sutton
University of South Carolina

Third Place
Tori Petry
Gemma Spofforth
University of Florida

PRINT


Best All-Around Daily Student Newspaper

First Place
Staff
The Crimson White
University of Alabama

Second Place
Staff
The Oracle
University of South Florida

Best All-Around Non Daily Student Newspaper (Large)

First Place
Staff
The Red & Black
University of Georgia

Second Place
Staff
The Miami Hurricane
University of Miami

Best All-Around Non Daily Student Newspaper (Medium)

First Place
Staff
The Flor-Ala
University of North Alabama

Second Place
Staff
The Minaret
University of Tampa

Third Place
Staff
The Chanticleer
Jacksonville State University

Best All-Around Non Daily Student Newspaper (Small)

First Place
Staff
The Current
Eckerd College

Best Student Magazine

First Place
Staff
Distraction Magazine
University of Miami

Second Place
Staff
Centric Magazine
University of Central Florida

Third Place
Staff
The Fine Print
University of Florida

Breaking News Reporting (Large)

First Place
Will Tucker, Ashley Chaffin, Katherine Owen, Mary Kathryn Patterson
Police arrest Temerson Square gunman
University of Alabama

Second Place
University Press
Lowdown on the lockdown
Florida Atlantic University

Editorial Cartooning (Large)

First Place
Phillip Henry
Cartoons
University of Georgia

Editorial Cartooning (Medium)

First Place
Jeffrey Vossler
Cartoons
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

Second Place
Michael Beckom
Cartoons
Savannah College of Art and Design

Third Place
Brandon Murray
Cartoons
Troy University

Editorial Writing (Large)

First Place
Staff
Editorials
University of Alabama

Second Place
Elizabeth De Armas
Editorials
University of Miami

Third Place
Julia Carpenter, Nicholas Fouriezos, Polina Marinova
Editorials
University of Georgia

Editorial Writing (Medium)

First Place
The Flor-Ala Staff and Josh Skaggs
Editorials
University of North Alabama

Editorial Writing (Small)

First Place
Ely Grinfeld
Editorials
Eckerd College

Feature Writing (Large)

First Place
Jonathan Reed
Harder than we thought
University of Alabama

Second Place
Tiffany Stevens
A full life. A fatal fall
University of Georgia

Third Place
Tyler Jett
Silenced voices
University of Florida

Feature Writing (Medium)

First Place
Jackisha FanFan
Back, hip and knee problems caused by heels
Barry University

Feature Writing (Small)

First Place
Malena Carollo
EC student travels home to Venezuela
Eckerd College

Second Place
Emily Hoover
Farm cultivates new life for disabled veterans
Flagler College

Third Place
Tiffanie Reynolds
Vets find strength in numbers at college
Flagler College

General Column Writing (Large)

First Place
Blake Seitz
Three columns
University of Georgia

Second Place
Jake Howell
Making Life mean more than just class
University of South Alabama

General Column Writing (Medium)

First Place
Zach Tyler
Columns
Jacksonville State University

Second Place
Alex Lindley
Columns
University of North Alabama

Third Place
Alex Caraballo
Columns
University of Tampa

General Column Writing (Small)

First Place
Max Martinez
Columns
Eckerd College

General News Reporting (Large)

First Place
Cassie Fambro
USAPD officer kills student
University of South Alabama

Second Place
Jordan Friedman
Emory Intentionally misreported admission numbers
Emory University

Third Place
Karla Bowsher and James Shackelford
Who’s In charge here?
Florida Atlantic University

General News Reporting (Medium)

First Place
Alex Lindley and Matt Wilson
Campus responds to delayed police reporting of rape
University of North Alabama

General News Reporting (Small)

First Place
Ryan Buffa
Preacher or protester?
Flagler College

Second Place
Megan Thompson
Live @ the Librar
Samford University

Third Place
Malena Carollo
Professor’s cousin and well-known journalist killed in Syria
Eckerd College

In-Depth Reporting (Large)

First Place
Karla Bowsher and James Shackelford
Secret pasts
Florida Atlantic University

Second Place
Randy Schafer
Rhythm and race
University of Georgia

Third Place
Evan Mah
Emory shuts down departments, programs
Emory University

In-Depth Reporting (Medium)

First Place
Edward Bailey
Tuition, fees up 50.8 percent in 4 years
Troy University

In-Depth Reporting (Small)

First Place
Seth Ravid
Judicial fines fund student life projects
Eckerd College

Second Place
Elizabeth Tomaselli
On patrol with campus safety
Eckerd College

Third Place
Malena Carollo
College makes headway in acquiring Arabic minor
Eckerd College

Non-Fiction Magazine Article

First Place
Patrick Riley
The Basketball diaries
University of Miami

Second Place
Laura Monroe
Will tweet For food
University of Alabama

Third Place
Caroline Huftalen
Unmatched.com
Savannah College of Art and Design Atlanta

Sports Column Writing (Large)

First Place
Ryan Cortes
Sports Columns
Florida Atlantic University

Second Place
Ryan Black
Sports Columns
University of Georgia

Third Place
Andrew Clay
sports columns
Troy University

Sports Writing (Large)

First Place
Ryan Cortes
Schnellenberger unhinged
Florida Atlantic University

Second Place
Marc Torrence
Fight on, fight on
University of Alabama

Third Place
Erica A. Hernandez
AmpSurf offers locals a new lease on life
University of Florida

Sports Writing (Small)

First Place
Kelly Coston
Senior Gibson thrills with speed on the field
Eckerd College

Second Place
Malena Carollo
Jenks serving up English
Eckerd College

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