Libeling SPJ

This blog post might be libelous. My last couple were, according to SPJ’s president.


I’ve been writing about the secretive way SPJ’s leaders are revising the organization’s Code of Ethics. After my last post, SPJ president Dave Cuillier called me and said I was “libeling SPJ.”

Before I recount that strange conversation, let me commit more crimes…

SPJ continues to unethically update its Code of Ethics.

On Saturday, the Ethics Code “working group” met in Ohio to keep discussing their revisions. After I blasted SPJ’s top leaders for not telling the board of directors (or anyone) it was spending up to $11,000 on this gathering, Cuillier promised it would be open and live-streamed.

It was. But SPJ waited till less than 24 hours before the meeting to tell anyone how to tune in. And it never told its membership anything: Wednesday afternoon, in its weekly newsletter to its 7,500 members, SPJ didn’t mention the meeting at all.

Thursday night, I emailed my fellow SPJ national board members and asked if the meeting was still on for Saturday – because no one had told us anything for weeks.

The answer from Cuillier was yes. After I complained it hadn’t been publicized at all, the meeting was announced on an interior page of SPJ’s website late Friday morning. A single tweet went out Friday afternoon.

(Privately, Cuillier emailed me, “The meeting has been advertised for some time – months – through various modes.” When I asked for links to those “modes,” he sent me this. Scroll down to the third-to-last entry.)

The meeting itself lived down to its promotion.

So much for “transparency.”


First, the meeting agenda didn’t include any names, and the live stream camera wasn’t placed to include everyone. So you couldn’t tell who was talking, and you didn’t know who they were.

They never introduced themselves at the beginning of the meeting, so I availed myself of this: “You are invited to participate in the process before, during and after the meeting in the comments section below.”

After the first 10 minutes, I posted…

Who’s talking right now? Who’s in the room? Any chance you’re going to introduce yourselves so the viewers who learned about this live stream yesterday can figure out what’s going on?

After 20 more minutes, I posted again…

Is anyone reading your comments? Can you please introduce yourselves? Who’s talking?

I tried again after 90 minutes. No reply. Instead, they watched a slideshow that couldn’t be read from the camera view, and they read handouts that weren’t shared online.

As this group of an unknown number started rewriting the Code on a computer hooked up to a projector, a commenter asked, “Is it possible to reposition the camera to focus on what’s being written? At this point, the language is more important than seeing the people at the table.”

After 2 1/2 hours, the camera finally moved in front of the screen. After 5 1/2 hours, they introduced themselves. Telling you this will probably earn me another weird phone call from SPJ’s president.

“You’re libeling SPJ, Michael.”


On June 24, SPJ president Dave Cuillier called me, and we spoke for an hour and 15 minutes. He was mad about the blog post I wrote the day before, and the one I wrote the week before that. Both accused SPJ of revising its Code of Ethics in less-than-transparent ways.

When Cuillier uttered the accusation above, I asked him for specifics.

“Well, Michael, you wrote: SPJ is revising its Code of Ethics in a most unethical way. That’s libel, in my opinion.”

I was stunned.

“Really, Dave? Are you threatening me or something?”

He sighed.

“You know, Michael, you can twist this any way you want, which I know you’re gonna do.”

“How do I twist You’re libeling SPJ, Dave? Do I need to get a lawyer here?”

Another audible sigh.

“I didn’t say that at all. But you just keep writing all this wrong stuff…”

His voice trailed off. I told him I wouldn’t write more “stuff” if nothing else stupid happened.

“I get it, Michael. We all get what you’re saying. I’ve told you that next month’s meeting will be very, very open. You just need to stop now.”

“OK, Dave. I’m done. If everything goes well from here on out, I’ll shut up for a while.”

That didn’t last long. Anyone know a good lawyer?


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