Posts Tagged ‘Jim Ewert’


FOI Daily Dose: High fees in California and stress over a school survey

Journalists and open government advocates in California are riled up about Gov. Jerry Brown’s budget proposal they fear could limit access to public documents.

California courts already charge $15 for court records searches lasting longer than 10 minutes. Under the new proposal, the courts could charge $10 for every name, file or information that comes back on a search, regardless of the time spent—a small fee some fear will come at a large price if it limits public access.

Initially, opponents such as California Senator Loni Hancock, D-Berkeley, thought the fees would stifle investigative reporting in newsrooms where journalists are already pinching pennies.

According to a Courthouse News Service report, a California Assembly committee rejected the fee increase, and the state Senate committee approved it with the stipulation of an elusive press exemption. But what that exemption looks like is anyone’s guess.

Jim Ewert of the California Newspaper Publishers Association told Courthouse News Service the exemption was added before the hearing on Thursday, and he just found out about it that morning.

“No one involved us in any of those conversations,” he said.

Even with the exemption, Ewert thinks any price for free information is too high, especially when the public is under-educated about government court activities in the first place.

“Number one, we don’t know what the exemption does. Number two, it’s just a bad idea to deny access to records that the public has already paid for, and shield the public from an institution that it already has very little understanding about,” Ewert said.

On a less FOI (but still relevant) note, a high school teacher in Batavia, Ill., faced scrutiny for reminding students about their constitutional rights before administering an allegedly self-incriminating school survey, according to the Daily Herald.

The survey, meant to measure students’ social-emotional well-being, included questions about their drug and alcohol use. When social studies teacher John Dryden noticed his students’ names were printed on their surveys, he told them they had the Fifth Amendment right to avoid incriminating themselves by not answering the questions.

But administrators deemed Dryden’s decision unprofessional because he did not consult authority before he spoke. Sources say the school board met Tuesday to discuss disciplinary actions against Dryden in closed session, but so far the outcome of the meeting (if it even happened) is mum.

Since the survey was administered in mid-April, students and parents who support Dryden have started an online petition yielding more than 4,200 signatures to “Defend and Support” the teacher they say is simply trying to “make his students aware of their rights as citizens.”

And in the heat of the First Amendment issues of late involved the Obama administration, teaching students about their constitutional rights might be more considerate than criminal.

That’s all for now, folks. But as you know, First Amendment issues are all around us, so tell me what’s going on in your neighborhood.

Kara Hackett is SPJ’s Pulliam/Kilgore Freedom of Information intern, a freelance writer and a free press enthusiast. Contact her at khackett@spj.org or on Twitter: @KaraHackett.

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