Archive for the ‘Twitter’ Category


How Twitter is keeping tabs on the news

Twitter's news tab, unveiled last week, as seen on iOS. (Photo by the author.)

Twitter’s news tab, unveiled last week, as seen on its iOS platform. (Photo by the author.)

Last week, Twitter made available to some users in the United States a new feature called the News Tab.

This tab, available on the social network’s iOS and Android platforms, allows the user access to top headlines from varied sources. When a user taps an article to see more, they will see a headline, a brief paragraph and a link to that article. Below the article are top tweets from other sources.

According to a report from the L.A. Times, the feature is available in Japan, and it has been suggested that this could be a precursor to Project Lightning, a program for news and event curating that was announced in June, according to a report from Fortune. Indeed, beyond this, it has led to new engagement via the social network, which has shown benefits for audiences and Twitter itself.

“It’s a smart move for Twitter,” said Jennifer Wilson, the social media editor for the Toronto Star newspaper in Canada, in a telephone interview. “They are upping the potential for sharing.”

Wilson added that this allows Twitter to give context on information whilst staying true to messages in 140 characters.

“The news tab is interesting because instead of checking your morning newsletters, you have a one stop shop for news,” Wilson said. “It’s a different way to engage people on the network. They’re doing a lot of experiments and this is just another one where you see people logging in and coming back.”

The news of the introduction of the news tab comes amid continued concerns of user growth, announced in second quarter results July 28. The tab is not available internationally, but Wilson says should Twitter decide to make it available in Canada, there will be questions news organizations have to answer, from how to get tweets out there, to ensuring audiences are served not just within the tab but also in their news feeds. These questions are also likely of other organizations including in the US.

On the issue of growth, Wilson said this was a direct response to what Facebook was doing in terms of its Instant Articles program, and for Twitter’s part, there was no restrictions placed by the algorithm.

“They’re highlighting that news is an important part of the service they provide to users,” Wilson said. “It’s another way to make sure users are getting the most up to date information.”

It is unclear however as to the news tab’s prospects in the United States, or indeed internationally. Reached by email, Rachel Milner, a spokeswoman for Twitter, said this was an experiment and declined to share any further plans.

Alex Veeneman, a Chicago based SPJ member and founder of SPJ Digital, is a contributing blogger to Net Worked and SPJ’s community coordinator. He is also Co-Student Life editor and contributing writer for Kettle Magazine, an online publication in the UK. You can interact with Veeneman on Twitter here.

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Whatever the beat, the facts are always king

The trading rumor surrounding New York Mets player Wilmer Flores reminds us of why the facts are crucial. (Photo: Deansfa/Wikimedia Commons under CC)

The trading rumor surrounding New York Mets player Wilmer Flores reminds us of why the facts are crucial. (Photo: Deansfa/Wikimedia Commons under CC)

It has long been established that social media has changed how we think about engaging with our audiences, from developing stories to informing them of what is going on as it happens. Yet, there is one particular question that arises when it comes to informing – to be first, or not to be first?

Media organizations and journalists are trying to be the first with exclusive news, and sports journalists in New York thought they had a big exclusive last week as the baseball trade deadline came and went. The New York Mets were said to be trading two players to the Milwaukee Brewers for Carlos Gomez, and the other player subject to trading was Wilmer Flores.

Joel Sherman of the New York Post broke the story before 9pm ET, as the Mets were taking on the San Diego Padres, according to a report on the subject from the Columbia Journalism Review. The news got through Twitter and all the regular places, and even to Flores, who cried on the field, distraught, embarrassed and concerned. The Mets had been the only team Flores had played for since his promotion to the major leagues, so one can understand the personal factors in the attachment.

However, the facts weren’t all aligned, and said trade would not proceed. Flores would stay with the Mets, overcoming the issue to beat the Washington Nationals that Friday, and Gomez would go to the Houston Astros. Readers and viewers alike had been misled, merely because of the rush to be first, in order to beat the competition.

The question of to be first or not be first does not apply exclusively to the world of sports. It applies to all beats, be it politics, business or entertainment. The audience want the truth – impartial, reliable information. It’s what keeps your relationship with your audience together. It’s what is expected from every journalist. It’s part of the job. If it’s a rumor, you say it’s a rumor, then work the phones, send that email, try to get to the bottom of it. Running with it merely as stated fact does no one any good.

To quote C.P. Scott, an editor of The Guardian newspaper in Britain during the 19th and early 20th centuries, comment is free, but facts are sacred, and in an age where rumors and speculation can run rampant on social media, the facts are crucial.

It therefore is better to be right the first time, and to tweet or post on to social media when you have everything verified. Not only is that what audiences want, they’ll be sure to come back to you for information on that beat, because you can be trusted.

And the ability to be trusted is, without a doubt, a home run.

Alex Veeneman, a Chicago based SPJ member and founder of SPJ Digital, is a contributing blogger to Net Worked and SPJ’s community coordinator. He is also Co-Student Life editor and contributing writer for Kettle Magazine, an online publication in the UK. You can interact with Veeneman on Twitter here.

The views expressed in this blog post are that of the author’s unless otherwise indicated, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SPJ Digital executive, the board and staff of the Society of Professional Journalists, or its members.

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Why Twitter’s concerns are journalists’ concerns

As investors wonder what's next for Twitter, journalists are also wondering the same thing. (Image: Flickr user Anthony Quintano under CC)

As investors wonder what’s next for Twitter, journalists are also wondering the same thing. (Image: Flickr user Anthony Quintano under CC)

Twitter earlier Tuesday released its second quarter earnings. While analyst expectations for revenue were beaten, the issue that interim chief executive Jack Dorsey faces continues to be that of user growth.

The number of active users went up to 304 million compared to 302 million last quarter, but including access to the social network via messenger services like SMS, the number was 316 million, compared to 308 million last quarter, according to a report from The Wall Street Journal.

Journalists represent a large number of the active monthly users on Twitter, and as speculation continues on whether Dorsey can ensure investors that it is on the right track, Dorsey must also convince, albeit indirectly, journalists whether Twitter is still a worthwhile platform for a social strategy.

At the core of Twitter remains the live wire element of news and information, no matter the subject, be it world affairs, sports, or that new collaboration between British electronic duo Disclosure and Grammy award winning singer Sam Smith. Many users flock to it to keep up with the events of the day, and as journalists, it has changed how we think about engaging with our audiences, and also the idea of storytelling and communication in the digital age.

Twitter has become the heart of a newsroom’s social strategy, giving organizations large and small the opportunity to develop new ways to tell stories through app integration and the 140 character bite size snapshots of the world. As the days and months proceed, Jack Dorsey must try to keep the users of Twitter happy, and that includes journalists.

One small change may make a huge difference in how Twitter can be used. It can be positive, or it can be negative. Twitter has changed journalism for the better, and helped it advance in the social age. The ball is now in Dorsey’s court to ensure that will continue.

Alex Veeneman, a Chicago based SPJ member and founder of SPJ Digital, is a contributing blogger to Net Worked and SPJ’s community coordinator. He is also Co-Student Life editor and media correspondent for Kettle Magazine, an online publication in the UK. You can interact with Veeneman on Twitter here.

The views expressed in this blog post are that of the author’s unless otherwise indicated, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SPJ Digital executive, the board and staff of the Society of Professional Journalists, or its members.

 

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Twitter Beyond the Tweet

It is hard to come by a story that isn’t somehow influenced by Twitter, supported by Twitter or started on Twitter. But Twitter is vast — there are more tweets being tweeted than one journalist can track successfully, but that doesn’t mean that Twitter can only be used to extract single tweets instead of whole pictures.

Millions of tweets are sent out during events — political, athletic, cultural — and those tweets can tell journalists what is resonating with people, what people are finding important and what they have opinions about. The Women’s World Cup final between the United States and Japan was one of the latest sporting events that garnered millions of tweets and international attention. In the U.S. it was the most watched sporting event all year. If a journalist truly wants to be able to use Twitter to tell a story there needs to be analysis and research to determine the key points and see what picture what actually emerges.

Twitter, along with companies using Twitter’s tweets, is doing the hard work for the journalists, and it would be a crime not utilize what they are producing. Even if the data and graphs that are being produced aren’t directly used in the stories, they may be used for inspiration that may spark a question, which leads to a new story idea and something is created just based on what people were tweeting about during an event. Twitter Data is the go-to place to find the data and maps about events, like the Supreme Court’s marriage equality ruling and a Q&A President Obama did.

CARTODB used tweets from during the World Cup final and mapped them to show where people were tweeting about the game throughout the world. The map is on a timer, so it can be determined at what point during the East Coast was tweeting more than the West Coast in the U.S. or when more people were tweeting about the U.S. as opposed to Japan. One of the keys to telling a good story is having some visual element to accompany what is being talked about or what point is trying to be made, using tools like this is an excellent way to create a clearer picture for readers.

The more resources, like Twitter and Twitter Data, journalists use to tell their stories, the more informed the public can be. It is undeniable that people are interested in what is being tweeted about, so using tweets in a story is a almost a guaranteed way to garner interest — add in a visual and success even more likely. To write a complete story it is important to use as many resources as possible, the Internet is full of them, and what Twitter is doing is just one piece of the puzzle.

Taylor Barker, a member of the Ithaca College chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, is the student representative for SPJ Digital. Barker is also an editorial intern for The Miss Information. You can follow her on Twitter here.

The views expressed in this blog post are that of the author’s unless otherwise indicated, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SPJ Digital executive, the board and staff of the Society of Professional Journalists, or its members.

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Dick Costolo and Twitter’s future for journalists

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo resigned Thursday as pressure to increase user growth continued. (Photo: Flickr user Joi under CC)

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo resigned Thursday as pressure to increase user growth continued. (Photo: Flickr user Joi under CC)

Yesterday, it was announced that Dick Costolo would step down as chief executive of Twitter, and be replaced on July 1st by Jack Dorsey, the co-founder of the site and himself a former chief executive. The move comes amid increasing pressure on the social network to grow the number of active users (according to a report from The New York Times, the social network currently has 302 million users.)

Twitter, in its form of live streaming the events of the world, has become an essential tool for journalists, and the resignation of Costolo may indicate changes as to what Twitter will become moving forward. Indeed, with the questions surrounding user growth, what may happen as Dorsey takes over and as new features are discussed and implemented may have a significant effect on the relationship with Twitter and news organizations.

While it is difficult to predict what is ahead, this is an important time for journalists to pay attention to Twitter’s outlook, particularly as it comes towards their own social strategy.

As Dorsey and his colleagues consider the moves however, there is one thing they should bear in mind, the simpler the social network, the better. If you try to make things complex, users will be hesitant to try it, or indeed recommend it to their friends or colleagues.

The same rule goes for journalists, who recently were considered to be the most active, verified community on the social network. If Dorsey allows Twitter to remain simple, and integrate in features that would not have a significant impact on the interface that many users see, it can help journalists do better work on the platform. That might include an editing tool, which Sara Catania of NBC 4 Southern California told me when I wrote about it last year, was something long overdue for Twitter.

The question of user growth will be one that will continue to be one that presents itself as Dorsey takes over as chief executive. But as he decides to figure out Twitter’s next chapter as a social network, he must consider his users, especially the many journalists that use the social network, for one move may change everything, either for better or for worse.

Alex Veeneman, a Chicago based SPJ member and founder of SPJ Digital, is a contributing blogger for Net Worked, and serves as Community Coordinator for SPJ. Veeneman also is Media Editor and a writer for Kettle Magazine, an online publication in the UK. Veeneman also contributes to The News Hub web site. You can interact with Veeneman on Twitter here.

The views expressed in this blog post are that of the author’s unless otherwise indicated, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SPJ Digital executive, the board and staff of the Society of Professional Journalists, or its members.

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The Power of a Picture

The saying goes “a picture tells 1,000 words,” but what happens when those 1,000 are misleading, untrue and misinformed? This is the situation that was created, according to Snopes, when a Boston columnist and radio personality tweeted a picture of an Army veteran who is a double amputee and CrossFit athlete. Gerry Callahan, the columnist, implied in his tweet that the veteran was the runner up to Caitlyn Jenner who was named the winner of the Arthur Ashe Courage Award given by ESPN. Now, I am not going to take a stance on whether Jenner should have won the award or not or whether the veteran should have won the award or not, but this is prime example of how the Internet and social media have the power to spread information at lightning speed whether it is true or not.

The rumor spread so rapidly and elicited such negative responses that ESPN released a statement about the award and a spokesperson for ESPN said in an article with MTV there “no such thing as a runner up for the three major awards” (Arthur Ashe Courage Award, Pat Tillman Award for Service and the Jimmy V Perseverance Award). It is understandable that people are going to have opinions about Jenner winning the award — what do people not have an opinion about? — but the problem comes in when people start sharing information that isn’t true or misleading.

This can happen just as easily with a tweet or Facebook updated during a major event. A supposed witness shares something on social media, news organizations and journalists pick it up, and all of a sudden the majority of people are believing one thing happened when in reality the opposite occurred. It isn’t a new lesson that people need to be wary of information they read on the Internet, but it is definitely one people should be reminded of repeatedly because sharing wrong information will only continue.

This is one area where journalists can be a service to the public. They need to be the ones fact checking the information they are sharing and looking in to what people are sharing around them. Journalists should be the ones who are cracking the rumors and informing the public what is fact and what is speculation. As social media use increases and more people have access to the Internet throughout the world, journalists should be increasing their awareness of what is going on and doing their best to ensure people are informed on the facts instead of the rumors.

Taylor Barker, a member of the Ithaca College chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, is the student representative for SPJ Digital. Barker is also an editorial intern for The Miss Information. You can follow her on Twitter here.

The views expressed in this blog post are that of the author’s unless otherwise indicated, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SPJ Digital executive, the board and staff of the Society of Professional Journalists, or its members.

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Instant Articles: A revolution in journalism

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, whose social network launches the Instant Articles initiative today. (Photo: b_d_solis/Flickr under CC)

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, whose social network launches the Instant Articles initiative today.
(Photo: b_d_solis/Flickr under CC)

Today, Facebook is launching its Instant Articles initiative, where news organizations will be hosting content on the social network’s site.

The official confirmation comes in a blog post from Facebook after previous reports, most notably in March from the New York Times, prompting rampant speculation as to what role Facebook would have, and how it would exactly affect the relationship it had with publishers.

There are nine publishers taking part, including the Times, BuzzFeed and the BBC. The feature is to start on Facebook’s iPhone platform, but expand in the coming months, the social network said, noting more publishers would also be involved in due course. Additionally, publishers are to take the revenue generated from advertisements in that content. Facebook says it allows publishers to provide a better experience for readers.

In that blog post, Mark Thompson, the chairman of The New York Times Company, said the move was significant because of the Times’ audience on the platform.

“The New York Times already has a significant and growing audience on Facebook,” Thompson said. “We’re participating in Instant Articles to explore ways of growing the number of Times users on Facebook, improving their experience of our journalism and deepening their engagement.”

With the release of this initiative, this opens a new chapter in social media journalism, especially Facebook’s role, and will be a revolution in the relationship between the consumer and the news organization.

Dick Costolo may be leading Twitter into a news production age if they acquire Circa. (Photo: b_d_solis/Flickr under CC)

Dick Costolo may be leading Twitter into a news production age if they acquire Circa.
(Photo: b_d_solis/Flickr under CC)

While it is early and the number of partners are limited, the move by Facebook, and indeed speculation of acquisitions and experiments by other social network sites, notably Twitter’s rumored acquisition of Circa, and Snapchat’s decision to hire Peter Hamby as head of news which is likely to affect its Discover feature, this will lead to a change in the thinking of journalism in the social media age.

Facebook has taken the bold step by becoming more than just a way to curate discussion on the news. It has become the news.

Today’s launch of Instant Articles will have significant implications on journalists working on the web. The relationship between social media and editorial content has changed, and while whether if it is positive or negative remains for the moment uncertain, it will change not just how we think about a story, but how we can engage with our audiences.

This is an important time for journalists near and far to consider this initiative and the future of their role in social media journalism, not just on Facebook, but on other platforms, for more moves like this may be on the horizon. We owe it to not just our colleagues in the profession, but ultimately our audience, to be ready for what is ahead, whether you write for a newspaper, produce for TV or radio or for online.

Facebook has shown us what is ahead in social media journalism, and perhaps for the industry as a whole. It is up to us to how we respond to it.

Alex Veeneman, a Chicago based SPJ member and founder of SPJ Digital, is a contributing blogger for Net Worked, and serves as Community Coordinator for SPJ. Veeneman also is Deputy Editor, Media Editor and a writer for Kettle Magazine, an online publication in the UK. Veeneman also blogs for the web site ChicagoNowYou can interact with Veeneman on Twitter here.

The views expressed in this blog post are that of the author’s unless otherwise indicated, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SPJ Digital executive, the board and staff of the Society of Professional Journalists, or its members.

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Could Twitter be more than a curator?

Twitter is said to be considering buying the mobile app Circa, according to reports. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons under CC license)

Twitter is said to be considering buying the mobile app Circa, according to reports. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons under CC license)

Twitter is known by many journalists to be a curator for information, allowing a new way to inform and engage audiences on various subjects. But a recent report may suggest Twitter may be going beyond its curating role.

A report from the Business Insider web site suggests that Twitter is considering acquiring the mobile app Circa. Sources mentioned in the report tell the site that no deal has been reached, and is a route the social network is considering.

The founder of Circa, Matt Galligan, told the site that he had been considering numerous options, but declined to discuss options with Twitter. Twitter, for its part, did not discuss any conversations with Business Insider.

“We didn’t put Circa up for sale,” Galligan said. “We’ve got a term sheet for a Series A on the table, but after evaluating all the inbound interest from potential acquiring parties, we decided we wanted to give more attention to those conversations.”

While nothing formal is in place, this raises an interesting question onto the role Twitter has in the newsroom, and if perhaps the social network would be going beyond a curatorial role, and enter an editorial production role.

Facebook is considering an editorial move, with the social network being the host for news and articles from various publishers. The Wall Street Journal reported earlier this month that Facebook is considering letting publishers keep all of the revenue from certain advertisements, as the Instant Articles initiative is said to debut this month.

The rumors surrounding Twitter’s possible Circa acquisition may perhaps be considered a response to Facebook’s move, and creating a new way to tackle distribution and the role of content in the social age. Whether it comes to fruition is uncertain, but it may lead to how more social networks think about their relationships with newsrooms, and more widely, how journalists view the relationship between not just social media and audience engagement, but social media and the editorial process.

Alex Veeneman, a Chicago based SPJ member and founder of SPJ Digital, is a contributing blogger for Net Worked, and serves as Community Coordinator for SPJ. Veeneman also is Deputy Editor, Media Editor and a writer for Kettle Magazine, an online publication in the UK. Veeneman also blogs for the web site ChicagoNowYou can interact with Veeneman on Twitter here.

The views expressed in this blog post are that of the author’s unless otherwise indicated, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SPJ Digital executive, the board and staff of the Society of Professional Journalists, or its members.

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Learning from Chicago’s social runoff

Rahm Emanuel, who won re-election as Chicago mayor after the first runoff in city history. (Photo: danxoneil/Flickr under CC)

Rahm Emanuel, who won re-election as Chicago mayor after the first runoff in city history. (Photo: danxoneil/Flickr under CC)

On April 7, Rahm Emanuel was re-elected as the Mayor of Chicago in the first runoff for the office in the history of the city.

Emanuel, known to many as a Congressman and the former chief of staff to President Barack Obama, defeated Cook County commissioner Jesus “Chuy” Garcia, 56 percent to 44 percent. The runoff came after an election earlier in February where no candidate had reached a majority of votes.

As the runoff campaign took place, Twitter had become a hub for reporting on the campaign, and for Lauren Chooljian, the City Hall reporter for NPR station WBEZ, she wanted it to become a core tool in her telling the story of the campaign.

“Because there was so much interest in the runoff (we hadn’t been there before), I wanted to be as open and transparent as possible,” Chooljian said in a telephone interview, noting she wanted to do snapshots of the campaign, with views also from voters. “As the race was ebbing and flowing (days that some thought Garcia performed better or Emanuel performed better), I did snapshots and longer pieces. I was tweeting much more often too.”

With the large profile this had gotten not just in the city, but also nationally on a political scale, Twitter had become a new way to engage not only those interested, but also attract new audiences. Chooljian had been getting followers from RTs from WBEZ’s Twitter account as well as from other followers.

However, Chooljian says, the traditional on the ground reporting still played a central role.

“Face time still means the most to the Mayor and Garcia,” Chooljian said. “All the tweets in the world can’t do what showing up and doing reporting can do. It can move the stories out further and get people involved.  I have no idea how many people hear my stories, but some of my tweets can go all over the place. Twitter is a way to reach a different segment of our audience.”

Chooljian looked at the human aspect as well of the story, trying to build the longer story of the campaign and the affect on the people of the city, and with Twitter, Chooljian said it made a difference as far as audiences go. She will continue to share her stories as she did with the campaign, and will cover City Hall the same way – trying to find that human interest, as well as information that is necessary to know.

“When it’s a big talking point, I’ll tweet about it,” Chooljian said. “It gets the info out and engages new audiences. That is when Twitter becomes a new tool for us.”

Yet, the bottom line for all journalists, Chooljian says, is trust in your reporting from audiences, whether or not it is on social media.

“If they trust your reporting, they will trust your reporting however you give it to them.”

Alex Veeneman, a Chicago based SPJ member and founder of SPJ Digital, blogs on social media’s role in journalism for Net Worked, and serves as Community Coordinator for SPJ. Veeneman also is Deputy Editor, Media Editor and a writer for Kettle Magazine, an online publication in the UK. You can interact with Veeneman on Twitter here.

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Verify, verify, verify, especially on social media

The Journalism School at New York's Columbia University issued a report April 5 regarding inaccuracies in a Rolling Stone story. (Photo - mathewingram/Flickr under CC)

The Journalism School at New York’s Columbia University issued a report April 5 regarding inaccuracies in a Rolling Stone story. (Photo – mathewingram/Flickr under CC)

One of the biggest talking points in the journalism world at this writing is the just released report from the Columbia Journalism School on the story in Rolling Stone magazine regarding rape at the University of Virginia.

The report, which notes failures that could have been avoided, also has implications for those working in social media and digital journalism.

Indeed, while social media has changed not only how news is consumed, but also how it can be reported, the big point still remains, to verify, verify, verify.

My SPJ colleague, Andrew Seaman, the chairman of the Ethics Committee, reached by email, says verification is crucial irrespective of platform.

“It’s incredibly important to recognize that verification and attribution is as important as it is for journalists reporting for print and broadcast media,” Seaman said. “The Society’s Code of Ethics is written with the understanding that all journalism – no matter where it occurs – is journalism. In all cases, speed nor format excuses inaccuracy. Currently, journalists are fortunate to have social media and other easily available sources to corroborate or verify stories. The trick is for journalists to use these avenues as tool – not excuses.”

Indeed, as Carole McNall, an SPJ Digital member and Assistant Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication at St. Bonaventure University in New York state, in a note on the social networking site Twitter, indicates, Rolling Stone should do more to ensure this doesn’t happen again.

“[Rolling Stone]’s apparent belief that they need to change nothing guarantees it’ll happen again,” McNall said.

For journalists, social media has allowed a new experience in how we consume and report the news, and this report should be a reminder of the basic principles of getting the facts and putting an ethical story together, whether you’re with a magazine, a broadcaster, an online publication or at a newspaper. When reporting on social media, ensure everything is accurate. Take time to verify sources and material. If you’re quoting a report from social, especially Twitter, verify it before running with it.

Social media can be essential, but used together with other reporting tools can help make a story great. Running with the facts just because they are posted on there doesn’t mean it is automatically true, so take time to verify everything before your deadline. Not only will verification of facts make you be a better journalist for it, it will help your organization grow in trust, especially in the digital world.

Remember, it is better to be right and be correct, than being first than being incorrect, and a great story has verified fact. Verify, verify, verify.

For the record, the Society of Professional Journalists issued a statement independent of this blog post, which you can read here, and you can read wider insight from Seaman on the report, posted on the SPJ Ethics blog here.

If you’re a digital journalist, I’d love to know what you think of this report and the affect on social media and other digital tools in journalism. Feel free to drop me an email or send me a tweet. I look forward to reading your feedback.

Alex Veeneman, a Chicago based SPJ member and founder of SPJ Digital, blogs on social media’s role in journalism for Net Worked, and serves as Community Coordinator for SPJ. Veeneman also is Deputy Editor, Media Editor and a writer for Kettle Magazine, an online publication in the UK. You can interact with Veeneman on Twitter here.

The views expressed in this blog post are that of the author’s unless otherwise indicated, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SPJ Digital executive, the board and staff of the Society of Professional Journalists, or its members.

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