Monthly Archive: November 2015


Journalism and the World | November 29th, 2015 | #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #
Turkey arrests 2 journalists

From EuroNews:

Two prominent journalists in Turkey are facing charges of espionage after publishing video that allegedly showed trucks, belonging to the state intelligence agency, carrying ammunition to Syrian militants.

Can Dundar, editor-in-chief of the Cumhuriyet newspaper, and Ankara bureau chief Erdem Gul are also accused of willingly aiding an armed group.

Both have been jailed pending trial.

“We will resist and win. It’s a coup against the press. They keep doing coups against the press. Continue reading


Journalism and the World | November 18th, 2015 | #, #, #, #, #, #
Journalism codes of ethics from around the world

Many thanks to Accountable Journalism for putting together this data base of journalism codes of ethics from around the world.

The group admits it is not yet a full directory of codes and asks for contributions from other journalists and journalism organizations.

This database is very much still a work in process and far from comprehensive! Through our crowd-sourcing initiative we are asking media professionals to send us their respective code of ethics or an update to contact@accountablejournalism.org. Continue reading


Journalism and the World | November 14th, 2015 | #, #, #
Brazil to extradite suspect in journalist’s killing

Investigative reporter Pablo Medina

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff has notified Paraguay, after eight months, that she has signed the papers to extradite Vilmar “Neneco Acosta, the alleged intellectual author of the murder of investigative reporter Pablo Medina 13 months ago, according to the Asunción daily ABC Color.

Acosta is to be transferred back to Paraguay on Monday.

Medina was an investigative reporter for ABC Color. He and his 19-year-old female intern, Antonio Almada, were gunned down in eastern Paraguay on Oct. Continue reading


Net Worked | November 12th, 2015 | #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #
The pen is not just mightier than the sword

The School of Journalism at the University of Missouri at Columbia, where Melissa Click resigned her courtesy appointment this week. Photo: mojourcomm / Wikimedia Commons (CC)

The phrase “The pen is mightier than the sword” is ubiquitous with the form and elements of change that can stem from the English language. Yet, in this digital age, the phrase by the English author Edward Bulwer-Lytton expands, for it is not the pen that can be mighty, but the video can too. Continue reading


| November 10th, 2015 | #, #, #, #
Community election results

Recently, the SPJ communities held rounds of elections for their new executive. These communities play an integral part in the future of the SPJ and the volunteers and organizers have shown great dedication not to their community, but also SPJ’s mission.

The winners are as follows:

Freelance: Chair: Anna Pratt Vice Chair: Michelle Sandlin At-Large Directors: Jennifer Karchmer and Susan Valot Secretary: Michael Fitzgerald Membership and Outreach Coordinator: Ellen Eldridge Resources Coordinator: Hazel Becker Events Coordinator: Amy Pritchart

Digital: Co-Chair, Programming and Strategy: Taylor Mirferendereski Co-Chair, Interactive and Social Media: Beth O’Malley Twitter Coordinator: Hilary Powell

Generation J: Communications: Andie Adams

International: Co-Chairs: Dan Kubiske and Elle Toussi

The community journalism community was exempt from these elections because of their recent formation at EIJ, and there were no candidates for the student community. Continue reading


First Draft | November 9th, 2015 | #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #
The best opportunities come by speaking up

By Alex Veeneman for Generation J

This past June, I began an interview with this simple question: “Why?”

My interviewee, on the other end of the telephone line, was Ari Shapiro, the NPR correspondent who at the time was based in London, taking a brief pause from his reporting to guest host Morning Edition for a couple of weeks from Washington.

I thought it would be a good opportunity to get his take on covering the UK’s most recent general election, and life as an American covering Britain, in an age where American coverage solely featured the Queen, the Duchess of Cambridge (or Kate Middleton as they’d prefer to call her) and the rest of the Royal Family. Continue reading


Net Worked | November 4th, 2015 | #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #
Tempted with fabrication? Write a novel.

Some say the cardinal sin of journalism is plagiarism, but me? I say it’s fabrication.

I won’t deny that plagiarism, even self-plagiarism, is stealing, deceptive, and unethical – but at least the information you swiped is true (unless the person you stole from is, in fact, a liar, which complicates matters even further).

In a journalism lecture this week, we watched the 2003 film “Shattered Glass,” a movie about the infamous journalist-gone-rogue Stephen Glass from The New Republic. Continue reading


Net Worked | November 4th, 2015 | #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #
Tempted with fabrication? Write a novel.

Some say the cardinal sin of journalism is plagiarism, but me? I say it’s fabrication.

I won’t deny that plagiarism, even self-plagiarism, is stealing, deceptive, and unethical – but at least the information you swiped is true (unless the person you stole from is, in fact, a liar, which complicates matters even further).

In a journalism lecture this week, we watched the 2003 film “Shattered Glass,” a movie about the infamous journalist-gone-rogue Stephen Glass from The New Republic. Continue reading


Journalism and the World | November 4th, 2015 | #, #, #, #, #
ProPublica report: Terror in Little Saigon

Many thanks to ProPublica for this story that makes it clear there was connections between events in the United States and other countries. (Terror in Little Saigon)

All together, five Vietnamese-American journalists were killed between 1981 and 1990. All worked for small publications serving the refugee population that sought shelter in the U.S. after the fall of Saigon in 1975. At least two other people were murdered as well.

FBI agents came to believe that the journalists’ killings, along with an array of fire-bombings and beatings, were terrorist acts ordered by an organization called the National United Front for the Liberation of Vietnam, a prominent group led by former military commanders from South Vietnam. Continue reading