Journalism and the World | June 21st, 2017

How Comics Empowered Me

By Dhruti Shah

I read a lot of comic books when I was a kid and it’s fair to say that they influenced my decision to become a journalist.

Lois Lane and Clark Kent have a lot to answer for. I might be in mid-thirties but I still have my trusty worn-out Superman sweatshirt I curl up into after spending intense days either working on investigations or sharing remarkable stories in ways that will make them interesting to a global audience. Continue reading


Journalism and the World | June 21st, 2017

How Comics Empowered Me

By Dhruti Shah

I read a lot of comic books when I was a kid and it’s fair to say that they influenced my decision to become a journalist.

Lois Lane and Clark Kent have a lot to answer for. I might be in mid-thirties but I still have my trusty worn-out Superman sweatshirt I curl up into after spending intense days either working on investigations or sharing remarkable stories in ways that will make them interesting to a global audience. Continue reading


Net Worked | June 11th, 2017

The pros of verifying

By Alex Veeneman

Twitter has become important for disseminating information, but you need to make sure its accurate before publishing. (Photo: Pixabay)

Last Thursday, the UK held a general election which saw a hung parliament. It also saw negotiations begin on a minority government between Prime Minister Theresa May and the Conservatives, and the Democratic Unionist Party in Northern Ireland.

But as the news of the election results came down, so did a statistic on youth voter turnout – which indicated that 72 percent of voters between 18 and 24 voted. Continue reading


Journalism and the World | June 7th, 2017

Media Coverage of Asylum Does Not Have to be a Part of Its Humanitarian Aspect

By Hebatulhayat Obeidat

A month ago I attended the Nobel Peace Conference in Germany. We were talking about the political situation in the world and the asylum that has become the top priority of the countries of the world. I remember specifically the story of a Syrian refugee who came out of the Syrian regime in a prisoner exchange deal, telling us her story and the death of her husband under torture.

It is a humanitarian story that summarizes the definition of asylum within some lines. Continue reading


Journalism and the World | June 7th, 2017

Daring to be Courageous in Work ‘That is Dangerous For Women’

By Jodi Hilton

From childhood I always believed I would be an artist, like many of my relatives. My paternal grandmother was a printmaker, my grandfather, an architect and an amateur bronze sculptor. My uncle was an accomplished painter and my mother a potter. But sometime near the end of my time as a college art-major, I veered off the art path.  I got interested in street photography and made a series of black and white prints from my travels along the U.S. Continue reading


Journalism and the World | June 2nd, 2017

Call to action to honor slain journalist Javier Vladez

By Dan Kubiske

“The great mistake is to live in Mexico and to be a journalist” — Javier Valdez, in his 2016 book Narcoperiodismo

Mexico is one of the most dangerous countries in the world to be a working journalist.  

When reporter Javier Valdez was pulled from his car and executed in Culiacán, Sinaloa on May 15, he became the sixth member of the Mexican press to be killed in two months. The growing number is a disturbing reminder that everyone is targeted, no one is safe: print journalists, TV and radio reporters, photographers, editors, owners. Continue reading


Journalism and the World | June 1st, 2017

Breaking the Silence, Empowering Female Journalists Worldwide

By Elle Toussi

“There are two groups of people that are more vulnerable during riots and marches: female police officers and female journalists.”

Last month I was in Washington D.C. getting various forms of training. During a seminar those words were directed to me from the in-house expert. The goal was to train us, the journalists, to be safe during civil unrest, marches and riots, but what left me shocked was that the expert gave me the “it is what it is” attitude. Continue reading


Collaborative Freelancing

By Hilary Niles

By guest blogger Hazel Becker 

During the Collaborative Journalism Summit in New Jersey in early May, my mind returned to questions I’ve been pondering since becoming chair of the SPJ Freelance Community this year. Who are we independent journalists? What makes us different from other journalists, or from other freelance writers? And why are we freelance journalists when we could be something else?

Hazel Becker is chair of the SPJ Freelance Community.

In my earlier contemplation, I asked members of our Facebook group to tell us why they freelance. Continue reading


Journalism and the World | May 2nd, 2017

Encouragement Sees No Borders

By Lynn Walsh

Several weeks ago I spent a week with 70 journalists from more than 50 different countries. We traded stories and frustrations, laughed, cried, debated the future of journalism, discussed the many current conflicts occurring around the world and experienced the welcoming and rich culture of South Korea.

It was part of an annual conference organized by the Journalists’ Association of Korea. I, along with Elle Toussi and Rebecca Baker, represented the Society of Professional Journalists.

Throughout the weekend, while posing for photos with the different community leaders, we would say “화이팅hwaiting.” In English, it sounded like the word “fighting” which seemed ironic to me at the time since the theme of the JAK conference was world peace. Continue reading


Journalism and the World | April 26th, 2017

Rebecca Baker Reflects on World Journalism Conference in Seoul

By Elle Toussi

After traveling more than 6,000 miles to attend the World Journalists Conference in South Korea, I was prepared for culture shock. I was prepared to hear about the wide-ranging experiences journalists face in far-flung countries. I was prepared to hear stories far different from my own.      What I wasn’t prepared for was learning how journalists around the world are all dealing with the same things: Layoffs and cutbacks. Concern about career opportunities. Annoying bosses and bureaucratic corporate culture. Continue reading